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Quotations from the Bible



Martin Luther, the first Protestant "Reformer," invented the doctrine of Sola Fide (faith alone). The key ingredients of this doctrinal system:

Not every Protestant denomination or system of theology accepts all of these points. For example, some believe that you can lose your salvation. Others believe instead that if you do not have good works it means that you were never really saved to begin with.

There are a few obvious problems with this doctrine:

There are many passages in the Bible which talk about salvation by faith or belief. I am not highlighting them because the purpose of this article is to point out contradictions between the Protestant views and the Bible.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


Salvation is more than "faith only" at an instant in time ...

There are many passages in the New Testament which clearly say that:

This section highlights many of these passages.

By way of overview, here is a summary of the things the New Testament says you must do to be saved:

  • Call on God (calling is a work)
  • Repent. Salvation requires repentance which means turning from sin and which involves action. Repentance is more than merely faith.
  • Confess your faith (speaking is an action which is a work)
  • Be holy. A life of holiness requires action which is a work.
  • Live a devotional, prayerful life (which requires work).
  • Perform good deeds (which are works). Good deeds are equated with righteousness and holiness.
  • Be obedient. Salvation requires obedience to:
    1. Christ's commandments
    2. Church leaders (The church is to be obeyed and church leaders are to have authority)
    3. The law
  • Get baptized (which is a work).

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


The New Testament passages (from Acts through Jude) ...

And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved. (Acts 2:21)

Refutes the Protestant doctrine of salvation by "faith only." In this verse you are saved by calling on the name of the Lord. The act of calling is a work; a "faith work," but a work nonetheless.

Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost. (Acts 2:38)

Salvation is not through "faith only" but also requires repentance and baptism.

Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord. (Acts 3:19)

Salvation is not through "faith only" but also requires repentance.

Who have received the law by the disposition of angels, and have not kept it. (Acts 7:53)

He doesn't rebuke them for their lack of faith in Jesus but for not obeying the law. Protestant Dispensationalists make strong distinctions between how a person gets saved in different times but this is hard to accept. If it was important for the Old Testament believers to obey the law then it must also be important for the New Testament believers. And if it is important for the New Testament believers to believe and receive the word of God by faith than it must also have been important for the Old Testament believers to do so. In short, a necessary ingredient of salvation is a life of obedience.

And when he looked on him, he was afraid, and said, What is it, Lord? And he said unto him, Thy prayers and thine alms are come up for a memorial before God. And they said, Cornelius the centurion, a just man, and one that feareth God, and of good report among all the nation of the Jews, was warned from God by an holy angel to send for thee into his house, and to hear words of thee. (Acts 10:4,22)

God received these "works" of Cornelius as pleasing to Him before he was "saved." But if Cornelius would have died before hearing the gospel he would have gone to heaven on the basis of his works which were pleasing to God.

Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. (Philippians 2:12)

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 3:21)

This verse states that we are saved by baptism. It does not say that baptism is merely a symbol of our obedience to Christ after receiving salvation.

For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. (Galatians 3:27)

Notice that it is their baptism (not their faith) that saved them. This passage refutes the notion that baptism is merely a symbol of obedience after salvation.

For in Jesus Christ neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision; but faith which worketh by love. (Galatians 5:6)

But let every man prove his own work, and then shall he have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another. (Galatians 6:4)

Works are important.

One Lord, one faith, one baptism. (Ephesians 4:5)

Baptism is universal. It crosses denominational boundaries. In this passage the word baptism seems to refer to more than merely a symbol of obedience after salvation.

For this ye know, that no whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God. (Ephesians 5:5)

More than just faith is necessary.

That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness; Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet [suitable] to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light. (Colossians 1:10-12)

In order to "share in the inheritance" we must live a holy and faith-filled life and we must have good works.

Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead. (Colossians 2:12)

Baptism is more than merely a symbol of obedience after salvation.

Night and day praying exceedingly that we might see your face, and might perfect that which is lacking in your faith? (1 Thessalonians 3:10)

Since their faith is deficient these people must not be saved (based on the Protestant notion of salvation by faith only). But Paul is speaking to believers.

To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints. (1 Thessalonians 3:13)

This verse implies that God judges us based on our holiness and that, therefore, more than faith is necessary for salvation — we must also be holy.

And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23)

Holiness gets us into heaven. According to Protestants these people are saved, but according to Paul they need to remain holy.

In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. (2 Thessalonians 1:8)

Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee. (1 Timothy 4:16)

In this passage it is Timothy's works that save him.

That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate; Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life. (1 Timothy 6:18,19)

This person wins salvation by doing good works.

In meekness instructing those that oppose themselves; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth. (2 Timothy 2:25)

Saved by repentance.

Alexander the coppersmith did me much evil: the Lord reward him according to his works. (2 Timothy 4:14)

If a person is damned by his deeds he should also be saved by his deeds.

For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries. (Hebrews 10:26,27)

Those who sin after salvation lose their salvation. Thus works are necessary for salvation.

Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. Blessed is the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him. (James 1:3,12)

Saving faith is not merely a decision of a moment, but involves a life of testing.

What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save him? Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. (James 2:14,17,26)

Faith without works is dead faith and cannot save.

Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied. (1 Peter 1:2)

Obedience is lifelong and therefore sprinkling should be lifelong. The word obedience doesn't refer to the instant of salvation by faith.

That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 1:7)

Faith is tested through our life. See:

Receiving the end of your faith, even the salvation of your souls. (1 Peter 1:9)

Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you. (1 Peter 4:12)

As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby. (1 Peter 2:2)

[NRSV] Like newborn infants, long for the pure, spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow into salvation. (1 Peter 2:2)

Grow into salvation, not after salvation as it should be if the Protestant view were correct.

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 3:21)

Saved by baptism.

Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator. (1 Peter 4:19)

Good works are necessary for salvation.

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. (1 John 1:7)

We must walk in the light to be saved, but walking is a deed.

And hereby we do know that we know him, if we keep his commandments. (1 John 2:3)

We must keep Christ's commandments to be saved. That this is a salvation issue is clear from the following two verses (truth in him):

He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him. (1 John 2:4,5)

But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him. He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked. (1 John 2:5,6)

Live as Christ lived in order to have union ("in him" = salvation) with Christ. Must be obedient which is a work.

And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever. (1 John 2:17)

Saved by doing, not merely by faith.

If ye know that he is righteous, ye know that every one that doeth righteousness is born of him. (1 John 2:29)

Righteous lifestyle is necessary for salvation.

Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him. (1 John 3:6)

Believers don't sin; if they sin they are not saved.

Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous. (1 John 3:7)

Our own righteous acts make us righteous; not mere faith, nor Christ merely covering our sins.

Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God. In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil: whosoever doeth not righteousness is not of God, neither he that loveth not his brother. (1 John 3:9,10)

We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death. (1 John 3:14)

Saved by love, not merely by faith. Specifically by assisting fellow believers / Christians (brothers) in their material needs.

But whoso hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him? My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth. (1 John 3:17,18)

By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God, and keep his commandments. (1 John 5:2)

Saved if we obey His commandments.

Who is he that overcometh the world, but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God? (1 John 5:5)

Belief assumes obedience or it is not really belief (faith).

By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name. (Romans 1:5)

Who will render to every man according to his deeds: To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life. But glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile. (Romans 2:6,7,10)

Salvation by works.

Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? (Romans 6:3)

Baptized — not merely a symbol but a sacrament.

That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. (Romans 10:9)

Salvation by confession. Not merely faith alone.

For I will not dare to speak of any of those things which Christ hath not wrought by me, to make the Gentiles obedient, by word and deed. (Romans 15:18)

Salvation requires obedience.

But now is made manifest, and by the scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the everlasting God, made known to all nations for the obedience of faith. (Romans 16:26)

Salvation requires obedience.

Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour. (1 Corinthians 3:8)

We are rewarded based on our works.

Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain. But I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway. (1 Corinthians 9:24,27)

These verses state that it is necessary that we persevere in our faith in order to win the prize.

Examine yourselves, whether ye be in the faith; prove your own selves. Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you, except ye be reprobates? (2 Corinthians 13:5)

Faith is not enough for salvation.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


Believers are judged ...

The Bible teaches that even believers are judged at Christ's second coming (parousia). Most Protestants claim that believers are not judged because their sins are forgiven. Why is this such a big deal? In sermon after sermon from many preachers of various Protestant fundamentalist denominations, I heard them insist that once a believer is saved in a moment of time, that they are not judged after that because their sins are forgiven and covered by the blood of Christ.This idea that believers are not judged formed a key part of their doctrine. If believers were judged their whole theological system would collapse.

I was troubled as I studied the Bible and found passage after passage that clearly stated that believers are judged, and not just as a "Bema seat" judgment to determine their rewards in heaven. This observation undermined their credibility — if they were wrong about this foundational doctrine, what else were they wrong about?

For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad. (2 Corinthians 5:10)

Holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain. (Philippians 2:16)

Seems to refer to judgment based on how well we ran and labored.

To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints. (1 Thessalonians 3:13)

This verse implies that God judges us based on our holiness.

And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23)

This verse implies that God judges us based on how blameless we are.

Marriage is honourable in all, and the bed undefiled: but whoremongers and adulterers God will judge. (Hebrews 13:4)

God judges based on our works. Note that it is the works of the person that determines God 's judgment and not their faith.

Blessed is the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him. (James 1:12)

God judges us based on our works.

Who shall give account to him that is ready to judge the quick [living] and the dead. For this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit. (1 Peter 4:5,6)

God judges Christians (the living). They must give an account. This passage is speaking about salvation.

For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God? And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear? (1 Peter 4:17,8)

Judgment of believers. The same kind of judgment on believers as on unbelievers — a salvation judgment.

The Lord knoweth how to deliver the godly out of temptations, and to reserve the unjust unto the day of judgment to be punished. (2 Peter 2:9)

Believers are judged.

Wherefore, beloved, seeing that ye look for such things, be diligent that ye may be found of him in peace, without spot, and blameless. (2 Peter 3:14)

Believers are judged. How could we be found without spot and blameless unless God were judging us to see whether were without spot and blameless?

Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have boldness in the day of judgment: because as he is, so are we in this world. (1 John 4:17)

Believers are judged. The need to have confidence because they are judged. If they were not judged once saved it is a moot point: why do we need confidence on the day of judgment if we won't even be there?

There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love. (1 John 4:18)

Fear = fear of judgment. We are to become perfect (in love) so that we will have no fear on the day of judgment.

But why dost thou judge thy brother? or why dost thou set at nought thy brother? for we shall all stand before the judgment seat of Christ. So then every one of us shall give account of himself to God. (Romans 14:10,12)

This passage states that all believers are to be judged.

Who shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Corinthians 1:8)

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


The dilemma of "degrees of faith;" faith increases ...

Are there two kinds of faith?

  1. Saving faith (once you have "enough" faith)
  2. After salvation faith can increase?

There are Bible passages which indicate that faith is a continuum and that people can have more or less of it. In Protestant theology if you have faith you are saved and if you don't have faith you are not saved. The Bible passages concerning degrees of faith don't match that model of what faith is.

Not boasting of things without our measure, that is, of other men's labours; but having hope, when your faith is increased, that we shall be enlarged by you according to our rule abundantly. (2 Corinthians 10:15)

For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man that is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think soberly, according as God hath dealt to every man the measure of faith. (Romans 12:3)

Different amounts of faith.

Him that is weak in the faith receive ye, but not to doubtful disputations. (Romans 14:1)

Weak in faith but still saved. How can salvation be by faith alone if people with weak faith can be saved?

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


Misc. passages that don't fit with Protestant doctrine ...

Notwithstanding she shall be saved in childbearing, if they continue in faith and charity and holiness with sobriety. (1 Timothy 2:15)

This verse does not fit Protestant theology at all.

And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him. (James 5:15)

James 5:13-16 provides the basis for the Catholic Sacrament of Extreme Unction. James 5:16 provides the basis for the Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation (Confession). Note that in verse 15 there is prayer to save someone.

They profess that they know God; but in works they deny him, being abominable, and disobedient, and unto every good work reprobate. (Titus 1:16)

It is by works that we can judge whether or not someone is saved.

Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost. (Titus 3:5)

In this passage the reference to "washing" doesn't appear to be a figure of speech. Thus we are saved by baptism.

Seeing therefore it remaineth that some must enter therein, and they to whom it was first preached entered not in because of unbelief. (Hebrews 4:6)

They must do the work of entering. They must obey this command. Therefore, obedience is necessary for salvation.

But, beloved, we are persuaded better things of you, and things that accompany salvation, though we thus speak. For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love, which ye have showed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister. (Hebrews 6:9,10)

Works are necessary for salvation.

So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. (Hebrews 9:28)

Salvation only finally occurs at Christ's parousia, not when believers receive Christ. The emphasis on being saved at an instant in time is a bit misguided and might cause people to de-emphasize their responsibility to grow in faith.

And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him. (James 5:15)

This passage doesn't fit Protestant doctrine at all. How can someone else's prayer save someone?

And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. (Romans 13:11)

Salvation is a future event. It occurs at final judgment.

For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. (NIV) (1 Corinthians 1:18)

Salvation is not a moment in time but a lifelong faith journey.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


Salvation at Christ's parousia (2nd coming) ...

And when the chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away. (1 Peter 5:4)

Receive salvation at Christ's parousia.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


The Role of Faith ...

It is certainly true that works performed without faith do not save us, however, the Bible and the Catholic Church teach that works have a necessary role in salvation.

The Protestant Reformer, Martin Luther, invented the idea that we are saved by faith alone (sola fide). The other Protestant Reformers and most conservative Protestant denominations accept this as a foundational doctrine.

It is not correct to say that these Protestants teach that works don't matter. Most of them agree that good works have some sort of a role in the Christian's life of faith. Preachers exhort their flocks to live good, holy lives.

Some say that a Christian who doesn't have good works ...

It is hard to understand just why Protestant anti-Catholicsare so passionately opposed to the Catholic view of saving faith. Perhaps it is merely a misunderstanding. After all, there have been times and places in Catholic history in which people had a works-based concept of salvation (but this is true of Protestantism also).

This article simply presents many New Testament passages which clearly state the Catholic view that good works are a necessary ingredient for salvation.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


The Bible contradicts Sola Fide ...

Protestants typically "explain" these passages by ...

I prefer to accept these passages as they are, and they teach that works of faith are required for salvation.

It is obvious that these passages teach that works are required for salvation. No wonder Protestant theologians and preachers spend so much time spinning their wheels as they try to demonstrate that these passages (and many like them) teach the opposite of what they clearly say.

QuotesMy comments

By works a man is justified, and not by faith only.

James 2:24

The Bible says that we are not saved by faith alone. How can it get more clear than this?

Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins.

Acts 2:38

Salvation is not through "faith only" but also requires repentance and baptism. This passage says that we are saved by baptism, not that baptism is merely an act of obedience.

Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.

Philippians 2:12

We must work out our salvation. It is not by faith only.

He that doeth the will of God abideth for ever.

1 John 2:17

Saved by doing, not merely by faith.

No whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God.

Ephesians 5:5

More than just faith is necessary.

By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God, and keep his commandments.

1 John 5:2

Saved if we obey His commandments. Keeping the commandments requires work, it is not merely abstaining from doing any bad works.

That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate; Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life.

1 Timothy 6:18,19

A person wins salvation by doing good works.

What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save him? Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.

James 2:14,17,26

Faith without works is dead faith and cannot save.

Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous.

1 John 3:7

Our own righteous acts make us righteous; not mere faith, nor Christ merely covering our sins.


Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."


More quotes ...

QuotesMy comments

For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.

Galatians 3:27

Notice that it is their baptism (not their faith) that saved them. This passage refutes the notion that baptism is merely a symbol of obedience after salvation.

Whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved.

Acts 2:21

We are saved by calling on the name of the Lord. The act of calling is a work; a "faith work," but a work nonetheless.

Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him.

1 John 3:6

Believers don't sin; if they sin they are not saved.

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

1 Peter 3:21

Saved by baptism.

But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him. He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked.

1 John 2:5,6

Live as Christ lived in order to have union ("in him" = salvation) with Christ. Must be obedient which is a work.

Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out.

Acts 3:19

Salvation is not through "faith only" but also requires repentance. Repentance requires abandoning sinful actions and performing good actions.

Who will render to every man according to his deeds: To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life. But glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile.

Romans 2:6,7,10

Salvation by works.

For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries.

Hebrews 10:26,27

Those who sin after salvation lose their salvation. Thus works are necessary for salvation.

For in Jesus Christ neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision; but faith which worketh by love.

Galatians 5:6

Faith must work or it is useless.

To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints.

1 Thessalonians 3:13

This verse implies that God judges us based on our holiness and that, therefore, more than faith is necessary for salvation — we must also be holy.

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God.)

1 Peter 3:21

This verse states that we are saved by baptism. It does not say that baptism is merely a symbol of our obedience to Christ after receiving salvation.

In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ.

2 Thessalonians 1:8

We must obey which requires works.

Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. Blessed is the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him.

James 1:3,12

Saving faith is not merely a decision of a moment, but involves a life of testing.

We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death.

1 John 3:14

Saved by love, not merely by faith. Specifically by not assisting fellow believers / Christians (brothers) in their material needs.

Night and day praying exceedingly that we might see your face, and might perfect that which is lacking in your faith?

1 Thessalonians 3:10

Since their faith is deficient these people must not be saved (based on the Protestant notion of salvation by faith only). But Paul is speaking to believers.

But now is made manifest, and by the scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the everlasting God, made known to all nations for the obedience of faith.

Romans 16:26

Salvation requires obedience.

If ye know that he is righteous, ye know that every one that doeth righteousness is born of him.

1 John 2:29

Righteous lifestyle is necessary for salvation.

Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee.

1 Timothy 4:16

In this passage it is Timothy's works that save him.

And when he looked on him, he was afraid, and said, What is it, Lord? And he said unto him, Thy prayers and thine alms are come up for a memorial before God. And they said, Cornelius the centurion, a just man, and one that feareth God, and of good report among all the nation of the Jews, was warned from God by an holy angel to send for thee into his house, and to hear words of thee.

Acts 10:4,22

God received these "works" of Cornelius as pleasing to Him before he was "saved." But if Cornelius would have died before hearing the gospel he would have gone to heaven on the basis of his works which were pleasing to God.

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.

1 John 1:7

We must walk in the light to be saved, but walking is a deed.

Who have received the law by the disposition of angels, and have not kept it.

Acts 7:53

He doesn't rebuke them for their lack of faith in Jesus, but for not obeying the law. Protestant Dispensationalists make strong distinctions between how a person gets saved in different times, but this is hard to accept. If it was important for the Old Testament believers to obey the law then it must also be important for the New Testament believers. And if it is important for the New Testament believers to believe and receive the word of God by faith, than it must also have been important for the Old Testament believers to do so. In short, a necessary ingredient of salvation is a life of obedience.

Examine yourselves, whether ye be in the faith; prove your own selves. Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you, except ye be reprobates?

2 Corinthians 13:5

Faith is not enough for salvation.

That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

Romans 10:9

Salvation by confession. Not merely faith alone.


Lest there be any misunderstanding, I want to clarify that we are not saved by works alone. Nor are we saved by works without faith. Any good works we do must be performed in faith. They must be works of faith, or "faith works."