End-time views


I wrote this article is to demonstrate the end-time views of the Early Church Fathers. Their writings and views are so often misrepresented that I wanted to give a detailed account of their particular views.

It is commonly acknowledged when discussing amillennialism that many of the Early Church Fathers writing in the first 4 centuries A.D. were premillennialists. This statement is partially true. These pages document in detail the end-time views of many Early Church Fathers.

   End Time Prophecy Leads to Rome | The Kingdom of Israel


Early Church Fathers:

Alphabetical:

Africanus | Apollinaris | Augustine | Barnabas | Caius | Clement of Alexandria | Clement of Rome | Commodianus | Coracion | Cyprian | Didache | Eusebius | Hegesippus | Hermas | Hippolytus | Ignatius | Irenaeus | Justin Martyr | Lactantius | Marcellus | Mathetes | Melito | Methodius | Nepos | Origen | Papias | Polycarp | Tatian | Tertullian | Theophilus | Victorinus


Chronological:

Mathetes — 90 A.D. Not premillennial
Clement of Rome — 96 A.D. Not premillennial
Hermas — 99 A.D. Not premillennial
Didache — 100 A.D. Not premillennial
Ignatius — 110 A.D. Premillennialists claim that Ignatius was a premillennialist but he wrote nothing about it one way or the other.
Papias — 115 A.D. He is premillennial (but it is unclear what his specific views were). In any case, his view is inconsistent with modern premillennialism.
Barnabas — 130 A.D. Probably not premillennial. Refers to 6,000 years of human history which is wrong.
Justin Martyr — 150 A.D. Clearly believed in a 1,000 year millennium. But his ideas about the conditions in the millennium would horrify modern premillennialists.
Irenaeus — 150 A.D. Probably not premillennial. Refers to 6,000 years of human history which is wrong.
Polycarp — 155 A.D. No end-time writings except to confirm the resurrection and eternal state.
Aviricius Marcellus — 163 A.D. He is clearly premillennial. Refers to 6,000 years of human history which is wrong. Has an allegorical style of interpretation which would horrify premillennialists (it horrifies me).
Tatian — 110-172 A.D. Says nothing one way or the other.
Hegesippus — 170 A.D. Not premillennial
Apollinaris — 175 A.D. No end time writings.
Melito — 180 A.D. No end time writings.
Theophilus — 181 A.D. He teaches nothing about a 1,000 year millennium.
Tertullian — 206 A.D. He is clearly premillennial but his concept of the 1,000 year millennium is nothing like modern premillennialists. And he asserts that the church = Israel which is an amillennial idea.
Clement of Alexandria — 215 A.D. Probably believed in a 1,000 year millennium.
Origen — 232 A.D. No one considers Origen to be a premillennialist. Origen himself refutes the idea of a physical millennium.
Hippolytus — 236 A.D. Probably believed in a 1,000 year millennium. However, he made two serious mistakes: (1) refers to 6,000 years of human history and (2) stated that the end would come in 500 A.D.
Julius Africanus — 245 A.D. Says nothing one way or the other.
Cyprian — 258 A.D. Probably believed in a 1,000 year millennium. However, he made two serious mistakes: (1) refers to 6,000 years of human history and (2) believed that the end of the world would come soon (which it didn't).
Victorinus of Pettau — 270 A.D. An amillennialist.
Nepos — 280 A.D. He is premillennial.
Coracion — 280 A.D. He was premillennial but changed his opinion after a debate with Dionysius.
Caius — 296 A.D. Unclear what his view was.
Methodius, Bishop of Tyre — 300 A.D. Although he uses the word "millennium" he uses it figuratively to mean "life after salvation." In my opinion he was an amillennialist.
Commodianus — 305 A.D. Clearly believed in a 1,000 year millennium. Refers to 6,000 years of human history which is wrong. His view is inconsistent with modern premillennialism and his ideas about the conditions in the millennium would horrify modern premillennialists.
Lactantius — 325 A.D. Clearly believed in a 1,000 year millennium. Refers to 6,000 years of human history which is wrong. Superficially his view sounds a lot like modern premillennialism but he has some serious inconsistencies (as do modern premillennialists).
Eusebius — 341 A.D. Not premillennial.
Augustine — 386 A.D. Augustine was clearly amillennial.